Monthly Archives: February 2015

Friday Fiction (Erotica)

Author’s Note: (a) Please note this excerpt is only suitable for over 18s. (b) This is an extract from the first Regency story I ever wrote, published by Xcite in the anthology ‘Ultimate Sins’ in 2007.

 

Beautiful Sin

 

Elizabeth dragged off her petticoat, which rustled sulkily as it dropped from her body. Lizzie’s fingers were already fighting the stay laces. The time for slowness had passed; they were both too impatient, too frustrated, too needy. Skin against skin against skin; the chemise was ruthlessly tugged away and Lizzie collapsed onto the bed with Catherine, legs tangling suggestively; hands pulling in Catherine’s hair; mouth warm and wet on her neck. Catherine arched her back, pushing her small, high breasts against Elizabeth, moaning at the delicious friction.

 

“Kate – Kate!”

 

Lizzie was humming a continuous note of pleasure against Catherine’s neck, the sound sending shivers through her. Catherine ran desperate, longing hands down Elizabeth’s back, cupping her bottom and pulling her closer, always closer.

 

“I want all of you – all of you,” she murmured huskily, rubbing up against Lizzie in every possible place.

 

There was a thin sheen of sweat covering both girls, and their bodies slid against each other. Catherine dug her nails into Lizzie, marking her in places no one else would ever see; and Lizzie bucked against her as the pleasure-pain hit. Then Catherine’s hand moved round between them, slipping between Elizabeth’s thighs and shifting back and forth, feeling the dampness within and knowing without words what Lizzie liked. Her fingers teased and twisted, finding the spots that pleased Elizabeth most; and Elizabeth squirmed in pleasure, her breathing accelerating, her hands still twisted through Catherine’s hair.

 

“There – oh yes, darling.”

 

Wednesday Word of the Week

Gnu – a large dark antelope with a long head, a beard and mane, and a sloping back.

 

I used the word ‘gnu’ in Scrabble today. And it made me happy. There is a picture of a gnu here: http://pleiotropy.fieldofscience.com/2010/10/im-gnu.html and a song about them here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YqgPyqyh4X4

 

One, two, three, everyone say “How do you do?” 😉

Satisfied Saturday Six

The SSS celebrates six things that have gone well, or at least okay, in the past week. It is the creation of Terry Egan, who is all things wonderful.

1. I made it to the ME/CFS Clinic this Friday, after last time’s attempt was foiled by our car engine stopping when we were travelling at 70mph on the motorway. And I think some useful things came of it.

2. I read 20 books in January, 16 of them new to me. I re-read a lot of books, so this is quite an impressive statistic of new reads.

3. Lovely husband and I celebrated our 12th wedding anniversary last Sunday. We got married (in UK terms) on the first of the second of the third – 01/02/03 🙂 It makes it easy to remember.

4.  I’ve confirmed that a local bookshop is going to stock my novel, Petticoats and Promises, which is very pleasing (and exciting!)

5. I have an appointment to see a Rheumatologist in a couple of months’ time. This is good because I’m having awful joint problems, but also good because the first date I was offered was whilst I was supposed to be on holiday. Having had to miss my last holiday thanks to ill-health, I didn’t want to do so again. So when the letter came through this week, I was somewhat depressed. But I gave them a call and they’ve moved the appointment back a week, which is splendid of them.

6. Erm…. *thinks* Oh, there have been satisfactory sports results from my point of view. Manchester United beat Cambridge midweek in the football, and England just beat Wales (sorry, Welsh friends) in the rugby on Friday evening. Yes, good sporting results actually do affect the cheerfulness of my week. Yes, this is kind of sad.

Friday Fiction (Article)

Author’s Note: An excerpt from an article I wrote for Jane Austen’s Regency World magazine a few years ago. On the ever popular subject of alcohol.

 

Alcohol!

 

“Does [Mr Allen] drink his bottle a day?” the obnoxious John Thorpe asks Catherine Morland in Northanger Abbey, going on to say that “at the last party in my rooms… upon an average we cleared about five pints [of wine] a head”. Now, even taking into consideration that Thorpe invariably exaggerated everything he’d ever done, there was still a note of truth in the comment. Alcohol was known to flow freely at the universities. Drunken students are not merely a modern phenomenon!

 

But drinking a surfeit of alcoholic beverages was certainly not limited to students. Jane Austen herself wrote in a letter to her sister that “I believe I drank too much wine last night at Hurstbourne; I know not how else to account for the shaking of my hand to-day. You will kindly make allowance therefore for any indistinctness of writing, by attributing it to this venial error.” And as to the parties of the ton, it was positively expected that the wine should flow freely throughout the evening and into the early hours of the morning. The Prince Regent, predictably, took drinking alcohol – as he took so many other things – to excess. Indeed, he was not sober even at his own wedding, and his new wife Caroline would later claim that George was so drunk that he “passed the greatest part of his bridal night under the grate, where he fell, and where I left him”.

 

Even away from the upper classes, however, it was common for adults to start drinking with their breakfast. Ale was a common accompaniment to the large plates of black pudding and other meats which constituted a Regency ‘breakfast’. Indeed, small beer, a phrase used to describe the second, weaker, brewing of an ale, was even drunk by children. Whilst it was low in alcohol (approximately 0.8%), it is nevertheless difficult to imagine anyone but the most hardened drinkers nowadays starting quite so early in their libations. And even they would be unlikely to give it to their children. Of course, the dangers of drinking untreated water meant that it was actually safer to drink beer than fresh water, which may give some measure of defence to the Regency drinkers.